Briefly Speaking: Headlines for Week of May 8, 2006


Nominate a Professor for the 2006 Distinguished Teaching Award

Nominate your favorite professor!Sponsored by the Alumni Association, the Distinguished Teaching Award (DTA) is the university's most prestigious honor in teaching for tenure track faculty. The award is presented annually to three full-time faculty members who exhibit extraordinary teaching in the classroom and a devotion to touching the lives of students.

Each award is accompanied by a $1,500 cash prize. Ask one of the many DTA recipients on campus to tell you what receiving this award has meant to them. Go online today and nominate your favorite professor.

PICK ONE! Nomination deadline is June 30.
 

Open Tank: Call for Entries

The Artists Network of Kent invites artists of Northeast Ohio to submit work for a summer juried exhibition July 5–29 at the Kent State University School of Art’s Downtown Gallery.

Eligibility for this exhibition is open to artists who live, or once lived in Ashland, Ashtabula, Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Holmes, Lake, Lorain, Medina, Portage, Richland, Summit, Stark, Trumbull or Tuscarawas counties. You do not have to be, or become, a member of the Artists Network of Kent.

The juror is Brinsley Tyrrell, Kent State professor emeritus of art and an internationally-known sculptor in Portage County.

For more information or to download an application, go to the Downtown Gallery Web site or e-mail schoolofartgalleries@kent.edu.
 

Kent State Stark’s Executive Chef Receives International Recognition

Victoria Todd-Smith, Kent State Stark executive chef and food and beverage manager, was honored with the Award of Excellence in Education for the work she has done in food and beverage education.
Victoria Todd-Smith received the Award of Excellence in Education for the work she has done in food and beverage education.

The International Association of Conference Centers (IACC) recently held their annual conference at the Cheyenne Mountain Resort in Colorado Springs. The event was attended by the following administrators from the Kent State University Stark Campus Professional Education and Conference Center:

  • James Dabrowski, general manager;
  • Victoria Todd-Smith, executive chef and food and beverage manager; and
  • Doug Kish, marketing and sales associate.

Todd-Smith was honored with the Award of Excellence in Education for the work she has done in food and beverage education at the annual conference for the past five years.

Each year, the IACC Board of Directors recognizes two recipients for this award based on their leadership in promoting conference center education. Sean McLaughlin of Benchmark Hospitality was also honored.

Todd-Smith was also involved with three major events at the conference: as a competitor in the International Copper Skillet Competition featuring six champion chefs from the United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, Sweden and Denmark; as moderator of the Chef's Roundtable, facilitating a lively discussion on hot topics in the culinary world; and as presenter for a four-hour culinary teambuilding seminar.
 

Conclusion of Spring Semester Signals Summer Construction

With the conclusion of Spring Semester 2006 graduation ceremonies, the decreased campus population signals the Office of the University Architect to launch new construction activities across Kent State University.

The Office of the University Architect's summer 2006 construction map.In response to the general aging of campus buildings and infrastructure, multiple construction projects will be undertaken involving everything from parking lot and walkway improvements, interior renovations, roof replacements and system upgrades to major demolition and building rehabilitation.

To assist in navigating around campus during this intense summer construction period, please utilize the Kent Campus Summer Construction map, which identifies impacted areas. At each construction zone, pedestrian-only walkways will be clearly marked with signage and delineated with fencing. Emergency vehicle access around and through each construction site will be maintained at all times. As project conditions change, updates will be provided to you by the Office of the University Architect.

For general reference, the construction detour map, as well as a complete listing and status of design and construction projects, access the Office of the University Architect’s Web site.

Any questions or concerns regarding campus access related to summer construction activities should be referred to the Office of the University Architect by calling 330-672-3880. Thank you in advance for your patience and cooperation while these improvement projects are under way.
 

Note Fiscal Year Cut-off Dates for Receipt of Information

The university will complete the fiscal year on June 30, 2006. Areas within the Division of Business and Finance must receive the following documents that are pertinent to the fiscal year by the due date outlined below. In general, documents received after the due date will be recorded in the new fiscal year.

Comptroller's Due Dates

In addition, travel and/or miscellaneous expenses incurred on or before June 30, 2006, are considered fiscal year 2006 activity. To properly record these expenditures in the appropriate fiscal year, online expense reimbursements must be approved by the final approval level on or before July 12, 2006.

Travel and/or miscellaneous expenses that span over both fiscal years and/or incurred after

June 30, 2006 should be considered new fiscal year activity. Therefore, the approver of an online expense reimbursement should not approve it until July 13, 2006, to insure it is properly recorded in the new fiscal year. For more information about cut-off procedures for online expense reimbursement, contact Katie Brown, assistant manager, Procurement, at 330-672-8649.

For more information about other cut-off dates, please contact Brad Staats, comptroller, at 330-672-2392.
 

Help Keep Alumni Connected to Kent State: Attend Upcoming Workshop for
Work with the Alumni Office for suggestions on how to keep alumni connected to Kent State.
Work with the Alumni Office for suggestions on how to keep alumni connected to Kent State.
Ideas

The Office of Alumni Relations has designed a workshop to inform campus departments about our programs and services in order to forge partnerships that maximize resources. With more than 170,000 alumni worldwide, we all need to have a role in engaging alumni in order to be successful.

The “Working With Your Alumni” workshop will be held on Wednesday, May 24, from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Williamson Alumni Center.

This interactive session will provide participants with suggestions and strategies that will connect alumni to the university by capitalizing on opportunities that already exist within your regular schedule of events and activities.

Join the alumni relations staff to:

  • Discuss how to formulate or enhance your plan for engaging alumni
  • Highlight campus partnerships that will maximize your alumni programming efforts
  • Learn methods for stewarding alumni
  • Identify innovative programming opportunities to involve alumni from diverse age demographics
  • Share “best practices” among departments
  • Discuss opportunities that will foster a sense of loyalty among current students
R.S.V.P. online by May 22 by visiting the Working With Alumni Registration site or call 330-672-5368 for more information.
 

Rain Gardens Reduce Pollution and Conserve Water

Rain gardens are specially designed areas planted with native plants. The layout of the garden provides natural places for rain water to collect and soak into the ground, as an alternative to the water running down streets and sidewalks.
Rain gardens are specially designed areas planted with native plants. The layout of the garden provides natural places for rain water to collect and soak into the ground, as an alternative to the water running down streets and sidewalks.
Stormwater runoff is a significant environmental issue because it can carry pollutants into our lakes and groundwater – and ultimately affect the water we drink.

But, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), there are a number of easy-to-take actions that all of us can use to help avoid this very serious problem. (For more detailed and specific information about stormwater runoff and nonpoint source pollution, visit the EPA Web site at www.epa.gov.)

The goal: efficiently use water in outdoor activities to reduce stormwater runoff and the associated pollutants that it carries.

Stormwater runoff, according to the EPA and other organizations such as the Clean Water Campaign, occurs when precipitation from rain or snowmelt flows over the ground. Solid surfaces such as driveways, sidewalks and streets prevent stormwater from naturally soaking into the ground.

This runoff water can then pick up debris, chemicals, dirt and other pollutants which then flow into a sewer system, or directly to a lake, stream, river, wetland, or coastal water.

According to the EPA, anything that enters a storm sewer system is discharged untreated into the water bodies we use for swimming, fishing and drinking water.

How do we work to help solve this problem? One way that the EPA suggests is to plant a rain garden to not only prevent the pollution, but conserve water as well.

Rain gardens (see the Clean Water Campaign) are specially designed areas planted with native plants. The layout of the garden provides natural places for rain water to collect and soak into the ground, as an alternative to the water running down streets and sidewalks.

The EPA suggests planting a rain garden to not only prevent pollution, but also conserve water.
The EPA suggests planting a rain garden to not only prevent pollution, but also conserve water. Get more information at www.epa.gov. 
As the water soaks into the garden, the plants, mulch and soil combine natural physical, chemical and biological processes to remove pollutants from runoff water.

Water can be diverted from a number of places, including rooftops and paved areas in order to provide the water supply for the garden.

There is also little maintenance involved with rain gardens because they use native plants. These plants are accustomed to the weather conditions of the area, and can endure a dry spell if one occurs. No extra watering is needed.

More information about rain gardens – and other information relating to stormwater runoff and water conservation tips – is available at the EPA Web site at www.epa.gov.

This article is being published in e-Inside as part of the action plan developed for the city of Kent and Kent State University that focuses on a variety of significant environmental issues. Watch for upcoming e-Inside articles designed to educate the university community about practical water conservation practices.


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