EPA Recognizes Kent State with 2007 Energy Star Award


Kent State University has been recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for exceptional leadership in energy use and management.

The power plant at Kent State uses steam and electricity, which offsets the costs of heating the campus.
Photo by Bob Christy

The power plant at Kent State uses steam and electricity, which offsets the costs of heating the campus.

At the IDEA Campus Energy Conference in Houston, Texas, in March, Kent State received the 2007 Energy Star Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Award, on behalf of the EPA. CHP is an efficient, clean, and reliable approach to generating power and thermal energy from a single fuel source.

“Through the recovery of otherwise wasted heat to produce steam for campus heating, cooling and research needs, Kent State University has demonstrated exceptional leadership in energy use and management,” said the EPA in the university’s letter of recognition.

The CHP system at Kent State has been able to achieve approximately 71 percent efficiency, says Thomas Dunn, associate director for campus environment and operations. The system uses 19 percent less fuel than equivalent separate heat and power.

By comparison, EPA estimates that the CHP system effectively reduces CO2 emissions by 13,071 tons per year. This reduction is equivalent to removing the annual emissions from 2,160 cars and planting 3,241 acres of forest.

“It is a very clean technology, and it is an economic savings for us,” Dunn says. “By using steam and electricity, we are able to offset the costs for heating the campus. It’s kind of like recycling.”

EPA started the Energy Star program in 1992. Energy Star is a government-backed program that helps businesses and consumers protect the environment through superior energy efficiency.


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