Generous Faculty Donate to Salem's Health and Sciences Wing Project


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Kent State University Salem's entire full-time nursing faculty for the 2007-08 school year gifted more than $25,000 to help renovate the campus’ gymnasium into a state-of-the-art medical learning facility. Collectively, the faculty and staff have raised almost $70,000. The generous contribution is reminiscent to that of Kent State University Ashtabula’s faculty and staff donations for a new Health and Science Building.

The nursing faculty at Kent State University Salem has donated more than $25,000 for a state-of-the-art medical learning facility at the campus.

The nursing faculty at Kent State University Salem has donated more than $25,000 for a state-of-the-art medical learning facility at the campus.

Due to the program’s growth, the Kent State Salem Campus has added faculty members to its nursing program during the past three years.

The current nursing faculty’s donations will build a Nursing Advising Center featuring faculty offices, common areas and conference rooms.

Mary Lou Ferranto, program coordinator and assistant professor, says the faculty discussed assuming responsibility for one piece of the project. She says the advising center is important to the faculty to recruit and support students.

Out of the 1,300 students enrolled at the Salem Campus, nearly one-third major in health and science programs. According to Matthew Butts, director of institutional advancement for the Salem Campus, the nursing program and the radiologic and imaging programs provide students with an excellent education, despite problematic facilities.

Butts explained an old maintenance storage area currently serves as a nursing lab, and a former office provides lab space for nuclear medicine studies.

Even with current learning environments, 94 percent of Kent State Salem’s nursing students passed the National Council Licensure Examination last year (compared to a national average of 84 percent) and, for the last two years, 100 percent of the radiologic and imaging students found work within three months of graduating (the national average is six months).

Ferranto believes the building will not only help students, but also impact the community.

“We appreciate Dean [Jeffrey] Nolte for having this vision and implementing it,” she says.

Nolte says, “It’s fantastic the nursing department has shown leadership in their philanthropy. They should be an example for the university.”

By Lindsay Kuntzman

Do you have other examples of those who put Excellence in Action at Kent State? Submit your story ideas to einside@kent.edu.

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